Norco Addiction | Norco In Ohio

Norco is a prescription opioid painkiller that contains hydrocodone and acetaminophen. It’s used to treat pain but has a high potential for abuse and can lead to physical dependence and addiction. Thankfully, there is treatment available to those who need help.

Norco Pills-Norco Addiction | Effects, Dangers, Signs, & Treatment

Norco is the brand name for a prescription opioid pain reliever that consists of both hydrocodone and acetaminophen. It’s typically used for the short-term treatment of moderate to severe pain.

Norco is classified as a Schedule II controlled substance by the DEA, which means it has a high potential for abuse and can lead to dependence and substance use disorder. Because Norco contains an opioid, abusing it can be dangerous.

In Ohio, the number of unintentional overdose deaths due to natural and semi-synthetic opioids like Norco was over 400 in 2020, an increase from 2019.

What Is Norco?

Norco is primarily used as an analgesic to treat chronic pain that is serious enough to require opioids or when other pain medications have not worked well enough.

The ingredients in Norco are hydrocodone and acetaminophen. Hydrocodone is a potent opioid that is often used to relieve moderate to severe pain. It works on the central nervous system to relieve pain and prevent coughs.

Acetaminophen is a less potent painkiller and is also used to reduce a fever. It is generally not habit-forming but large doses can lead to liver damage. 

Other Names For Norco

The combination of hydrocodone and acetaminophen goes by more than one name. The prescription drug can also be found under the following names:

  • Anexsia
  • Anolor DH
  • Vicodin
  • Lortab
  • Hycet
  • Lorcet

Is Norco Addictive?

While acetaminophen is not habit-forming even when it’s taken over a long period of time, hydrocodone can be very addictive and lead to psychological and physical dependence. 

This is especially the case if you take a higher dose than directed.

When your body becomes dependent on Norco and you try to stop taking it, severe withdrawal symptoms can appear. This can make abstinence very difficult and often leads people to go back on the medication to feel some relief from withdrawal symptoms.

Side Effects Of Norco Use

Even if you’re taking Norco as directed, it can lead to side effects that can be both common and severe.

The most common Norco side effects may include:

  • constipation
  • drowsiness
  • sleepiness
  • lightheadedness
  • fuzzy thinking
  • anxiety
  • mood changes
  • dry throat
  • difficulty urinating
  • rash
  • itching
  • narrowing of the pupils

Signs Of Norco Abuse & Addiction

If you are worried that you or a loved one may be abusing Norco, there are some signs you can look out for. The signs of Norco abuse and addiction may include:

  • taking more than the prescribed dosage
  • taking Norco without a prescription
  • doctor shopping to receive multiple prescriptions for Norco
  • withdrawing from social activities
  • neglecting responsibilities at home, school, and work
  • building up a tolerance (needing higher and higher doses to get the desired effect)
  • mixing Norco with other drugs
  • experiencing hydrocodone withdrawal symptoms when you stop use

Norco Overdose

When you take a high dose of Norco or take it along with other substances like alcohol, cocaine, or other opioids, you increase your risk of opioid overdose. 

Signs and symptoms of a Norco overdose can include:

  • cold, clammy skin
  • dark urine
  • difficulty breathing
  • nausea and vomiting
  • stomach cramping
  • blu-ish lips, fingernails, or skin
  • pinpoint pupils
  • unconsciousness
  • extreme drowsiness
  • irregular heart rate
  • low blood pressure
  • seizures
  • coma

If you have access to naloxone (Narcan), now is the time to administer it. It can reverse the overdose effects of most opioid medications.

Norco Addiction Treatment

There are several options for Norco addiction treatment, including medical detox, inpatient or outpatient care, and medication-assisted treatment.

Medical Detox

Medical detox for opioid addiction involves medical supervision and support during the worst of withdrawal. In a healthcare setting, nurses and medical staff can monitor your symptoms, keep you safe and comfortable, and prepare you for inpatient or outpatient addiction treatment. 

Inpatient/Outpatient Care

During an inpatient or outpatient treatment program, you attend therapy (individual and group), go to support groups, receive mental health and medical care, and participate in wellness activities. You also learn how to deal with triggers and strategies for relapse prevention. 

Medication-Assisted Treatment

With medication-assisted treatment (MAT), you’re prescribed medications for opioid use disorder like methadone, naltrexone, or buprenorphine. These medications can help ease cravings and lessen the intensity of opioid dependence.

If you or a loved one live with opiate/opioid addiction, contact us today for information on our inpatient treatment options.

FAQs

Can You Snort Norco?

Yes, Norco is an opioid prescription drug tablet that can be crushed and snorted. However, this may lead to serious health conditions.

Learn more about Snorting Norco

How Long Does Norco Stay In Your System?

How long Norco stays in your system depends on a variety of factors like age and frequency of drug use. On average, Norco can stay in your system for up to 24 hours and can be detected on drug tests from one to three days after the last dose.

Learn more about How Long Norco Stays In Your System

What Does Norco Look Like?

Norco primarily comes in white, yellow, or orange tablets and is usually oblong in shape. What differs is the strength of the medication and the imprint on each tablet.

Learn more about What Norco Looks Like

Is Rectal Norco Use Effective?

Rectal administration of Norco (hydrocodone/acetaminophen) may provide a faster and potentially more intense effect than oral administration. 

However, this is uncommon, and misusing Norco in this way may cause serious harm to your rectal tissue and increase your risk of both acetaminophen and opioid overdose.

Learn more about Plugging Norco

What Happens If You Smoke Norco?

If you smoke Norco (hydrocodone/acetaminophen), you will likely experience greater side effects of the drug including sedation and dizziness. However, continued use of Norco in this manner may result in problems with lung health and an increased risk of overdose.

Learn more about Smoking Norco

Written by
Ohio Recovery Center Editorial Team

Published on: October 12, 2022

©2023 Ohio Recovery Center | All Rights Reserved

This page does not provide medical advice.

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