Oxycodone Addiction | Oxycodone In Ohio

Oxycodone Addiction In Ohio | Effects, Signs, & Treatment

Oxycodone (brand name Oxycontin, sometimes referred to as oxy) is a semi-synthetic prescription opioid used to manage severe pain. 

According to the United States Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), this pain medication is a Schedule II controlled substance with a high potential for abuse.

Abusing this painkiller or taking oxycodone for chronic pain over a long period of time can lead to possible dependence or oxycodone addiction. This pain medication acts with opioid receptors in the brain to affect the central nervous system (CNS) and provide pain relief.

A number of drugs combine acetaminophen with oxycodone, including Percocet.

Effects Of Oxycodone Use

While oxycodone is helpful for those suffering from pain, it can also cause a number of side effects when used as prescribed.

Short-Term Side Effects

Some of the short-term side effects of oxycodone may include:

  • euphoria
  • drowsiness
  • dizziness
  • constipation
  • dry mouth
  • changes in mood
  • headache

Long-Term Side Effects

Although not used for long-term pain management, oxycodone can sometimes be prescribed for those dealing with chronic pain. However, long-term abuse of this medication may lead to:

  • dependence or cravings for the drug
  • withdrawal symptoms after stopping use
  • fatigue
  • insomnia
  • respiratory depression
  • overdose

Signs Of Oxycodone Abuse

There are a number of signs a person may recognize if a loved one is participating in opioid abuse. If a person continues to seek out the desired effect from the opiate drug, they may turn to other illicit drugs or narcotics such as heroin, morphine, or fentanyl.

In addition to this, a person may combine oxycodone with other CNS depressants such as benzodiazepines or alcohol. Hydrocodone (brand name Vicodin) is a prescription drug similar to oxycodone that should not be combined with this opioid medication.

Snorting Oxycodone

People may abuse oxycodone by using routes of administration that aren’t prescribed. The oxycodone pain reliever can be crushed into a powder and snorted. 

When a person does this, damage to the nasal cavity such as bacterial infections, a chronic runny nose, or persistent nosebleeds may occur.

Injecting Oxycodone

Others may choose to inject the drug. Once oxycodone is turned into a powder, it can be combined with a liquid and injected into a vein. This can cause abscesses on the skin, blood clots, and even be a risk factor for developing HIV or other diseases if a person shares a contaminated needle.

Oxycodone Withdrawal Symptoms

For those who abuse oxycodone and suddenly stop taking the drug, withdrawal symptoms may occur. Some of these symptoms may consist of:

  • mental health problems such as anxiety or depression
  • irritability
  • weakness
  • yawning
  • loss of appetite
  • sweating
  • nausea
  • vomiting
  • fast heart rate
  • diarrhea
  • chills

Oxycodone Overdose

Those who abuse oxycodone may experience an opioid overdose. If this takes place, some of the symptoms a person may exhibit include:

  • cold or clammy skin
  • unresponsiveness
  • respiratory depression
  • weak muscles
  • extreme sleepiness
  • difficulty breathing

If you suspect an opioid overdose has occurred, contact 911 immediately. 

Opioid Addiction Treatment In Ohio

According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), there are a number of medications used to help treat opioid use disorders including buprenorphine, naltrexone, and methadone.

Whether you choose to be part of an inpatient or outpatient program, a treatment center can assist you on your road to recovery.

Medical Detox

One of the first major steps in the treatment process includes detoxification. Through detox, your body will rid itself of the unwanted toxins caused by substance abuse. Although this process can be short-term, detox programs provide medical supervision as your body undergoes withdrawal.

Behavioral Health Care

Another form of treatment includes cognitive behavioral therapy in which you can speak with a licensed psychologist or psychiatrist to assist you during your journey to sobriety. Many treatment programs provide group therapy as well.

If a family member or another loved one is struggling with drug addiction, consider contacting Ohio Recovery Center today. To speak with one of our healthcare representatives about our inpatient treatment options, please contact us today.

Written by
Ohio Recovery Center Editorial Team

Published on: July 21, 2022

©2022 Ohio Recovery Center | All Rights Reserved

This page does not provide medical advice.

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