Ativan (Lorazepam) Withdrawal Symptoms | Timeline & Detox

Ativan withdrawal symptoms may include headache, worsening mental health, psychosis, seizures, and severe cravings. Illicit substance use involving Ativan can also increase the severity of withdrawal symptoms.

Lorazepam withdrawal symptoms include headache, worsening anxiety, trouble sleeping, mood changes, seizures, and psychosis. You may experience these withdrawal symptoms if you stop taking Ativan abruptly.

Acute withdrawal symptoms of Ativan can last between one day to one month after your last dose. You may be more likely to experience withdrawal symptoms if you take Ativan for more than one month at a time. 

Taking high doses of lorazepam can also increase your risk of withdrawal.

Lorazepam is a Schedule IV controlled substance for treating anxiety disorders and panic attacks. In Ohio, lorazepam is abused for its sedative side effects and the ability to get high on the drug. 

Ohio addiction treatment centers can offer detox programs and behavioral health services if you cannot stop taking Ativan.

Ativan Withdrawal Symptoms

Symptoms of Ativan withdrawal may include:

  • headache
  • anxiety
  • worsening mental health
  • vomiting
  • muscle aches
  • loss of appetite
  • sudden weight loss
  • high blood pressure
  • increased heart rate
  • palpitations
  • seizures
  • psychosis
  • cravings for lorazepam

The severity of withdrawal symptoms you experience may depend on how long you took Ativan and the strength of your doses.

Benzodiazepine withdrawal syndrome can happen after you have a physical dependence on Ativan, a state where your body needs the drug to function normally. 

Risk factors for benzodiazepine dependence may include taking benzodiazepines for more than 1 month, or abusing benzodiazepines to get high.

Ativan Withdrawal Timeline

The withdrawal process for Ativan can start as soon as one day after your last dose, and last for up to one month. During the withdrawal process, you may experience both mild and severe withdrawal symptoms.

PAWS

After the acute withdrawal period, you may experience post-acute withdrawal syndrome (PAWS), a condition where withdrawal symptoms suddenly appear months after your last case of Ativan use.

Ativan withdrawal symptoms can be uncomfortable, painful, and even life-threatening in severe cases. Due to the risk of relapse and serious side effects, professional substance use treatment programs may benefit you or a loved one going through Ativan withdrawal.

Detox Programs For Benzodiazepine Withdrawal

Ativan detox programs can help you quit lorazepam in a safe environment. 

Medical detoxes are recommended over quitting cold turkey (all at once) at home, since you may have access to tapering schedules, medication, and other treatment options while you go through the withdrawal process.

If you or a loved one experience Ativan withdrawal, you may be struggling with long-term Ativan addiction. Getting help from an Ohio treatment facility can give you access to behavioral therapy, aftercare services,

For information on our inpatient prescription drug abuse treatment program, please contact us today.

  1. Australian Prescriber https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4657308/
  2. Drug Enforcement Administration https://www.dea.gov/drug-information/drug-scheduling
  3. Food and Drug Administration https://www.accessdata.fda.gov/drugsatfda_docs/label/2016/017794s044lbl.pdf
  4. World Health Organization https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK310652/

Written by Ohio Recovery Center Editorial Team

Published on: August 18, 2023

© 2024 Ohio Recovery Center | All Rights Reserved

* This page does not provide medical advice.

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